Humanitarian Hospitality

I’ve been listening to news about Hurricane Harvey and reports of the rescues by first responders and good Samaritans. Disasters like this seem to bring out the best in folks who are willing to help wherever they can.

I’d like to think that everyone would step in to help in the face of a great emergency. Having just read The German Girl, by Armando Lucas Correa, I’m not so sure.

In 1939, a German ship, the MS St. Louis, set sail for Cuba with over 900 Jewish refugees aboard. Shortly before the ship arrived in Cuba, the Cuban government had a change of heart and denied entry to all but a few of the passengers. The United States and Canada also refused to allow the refugees into their countries. The St. Louis returned to Europe where the refugees were accepted into several European countries. Eventually, as World War II waged on, many of these people fell victim to the death camps.

The German Girl, a novel, is the story of Hannah, who was twelve years old when she and her family set sail on the St. Louis. The story is told alternately by Hannah and her descendant, Anna, who is learning to deal with a tragedy of her own. It was one of those “can’t put down” books; despite the heart-wrenching story, it was enjoyable and easy to read.

While The German Girl is not specifically labeled for young people, I would encourage older high school students to read it. The plight of Jewish refugees during World War II is one of those stories that needs to be told and retold.

Enjoy your Free-Reading Friday!

The German Girl

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